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AMS-01

AMS-01 is the precursor experiment which flew on the shuttle Discovery on the STS-91 mission, from 2nd to 12th of June 1998. An historical document, the AMS-01 brochure, describes it in detail.

The AMS-01 experiment was built around a permanent cylindrical magnet built with 6,000 small NdFeB blocks. It has been the first large magnetic spectrometer ever operated in space.

The subdetectors installed on AMS-01 were:

  • Silicon Detector, to measure the sign of the charge and the momentum of the charged particles
  • Time of Flight, to measure the velocity of the charged particles and to provide the trigger of the experiment
  • An Anticounter system, to veto particles traversing the spectrometer but crossing the magnet walls
  • A threshold Cerenkov detector, to separate low velocity from high velocity particles

During the 10 days mission, AMS-01 collected nearly 80 M of triggers, which were analyzed off line after the return to ground. The results of the analysis of these data where published on a series of highly cited papers, including a Physics Report:

  1. Search for anti-helium in cosmic rays. By AMS Collaboration (J. Alcaraz et al.). Feb 2000. 18pp. Phys.Lett.B 461:387-396, 1999.
  2. Helium in near Earth orbit. By AMS Collaboration (J. Alcaraz et al.). Nov 2000. 10pp. Phys.Lett.B 494:193-202, 2000. 9pp.
  3. Cosmic protons. By AMS Collaboration (J. Alcaraz et al.). 2000. 8pp. Phys.Lett.B 490:27-35, 2000.
  4. Leptons in near earth orbit. By AMS Collaboration (J. Alcaraz et al.). 2000. 13pp. Phys.Lett.B 484:10-22, 2000, Erratum-ibid.B495:440, 2000.
  5. Protons in near earth orbit. By AMS Collaboration (J. Alcaraz et al.). Feb 2000. 19pp. Phys.Lett.B 472:215-226, 2000.
  6. A Study of cosmic ray secondaries induced by the Mir space station using AMS-01. By AMS-01 Collaboration (M. Aguilar et al.). Jun 2004, 18pp. Nucl.Instrum.Meth.B234:321-332, 2005.
  7. Cosmic-ray positron fraction measurement from 1 to 30-GeV with AMS-01. By AMS-01 Collaboration (M. Aguilar et al.). Jun 2004, 18pp. Phys.Lett.B646:145-154, 2007.

Other published papers on STS91 data analysis: 

  1. Leptons with E > 200-MeV trapped in the earth’s radiation belts. E. Fiandrini et al., 2002. 7pp. J. of Geo., Res.107,A6 10, 2002.
  2. Leptons with E > 200 MeV trapped near the South Atlantic Anomaly. E. Fiandrini et al., 2003, 11pp. J. of Geo., Res.108, A11 1402, 2003.
  3. Protons with kinetic Energy E > 70 MeV trapped in the earth’s radiation belts. E. Fiandrini et al., 2004, 12pp. J. of Geo., Res.109, A10214, 2004.



 
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Editor: Cindy Ocel
NASA Official: Trent Martin
Last Updated: April 03, 2013
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